Unlock Your Future: 1-Year Cybersecurity Diploma in Ethical Hacking with A7 Security Hunters in Rohtak City

"Empower Your Future: Master Cybersecurity with Ethical Hacking Expertise!"


 

Secure Your Career with Our 1-Year Cybersecurity Diploma in Partnership with A7 Security Hunters

 

Are you ready to take the next step towards a rewarding career in cybersecurity? Look no further! Our comprehensive 1-year Cybersecurity Diploma, offered in collaboration with A7 Security Hunters, is your gateway to success in the dynamic world of cybersecurity.

 

 

Why choose our program?

 

Cutting-Edge Curriculum: Our curriculum is carefully crafted to cover the latest trends, tools, and techniques in cybersecurity. From ethical hacking and penetration testing to risk management and digital forensics, you'll gain a comprehensive understanding of the field.

 

 

Hands-On Experience: Theory comes to life in our state-of-the-art labs, where you'll tackle real-world cybersecurity challenges under the guidance of industry experts. Get hands-on experience with industry-standard tools and technologies, preparing you for the demands of the job market.

 

 

Industry Connections: Benefit from our partnership with A7 Security Hunters, a leading cybersecurity firm. Gain insights from guest lectures, workshops, and networking events hosted by industry professionals. Build connections that can open doors to exciting job opportunities upon graduation

 

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Certification Preparation: Prepare for industry-recognized certifications such as CEH, CompTIA Security+, and CISSP, enhancing your credentials and making you stand out to potential employers.

 

 

Career Support: Our dedicated career services team is here to support you every step of the way. From resume writing workshops to mock interviews, we'll help you polish your professional image and land your dream job in cybersecurity.

 

 

In-Demand Skills: Cybersecurity professionals are in high demand across industries. With our diploma in hand, you'll possess the skills and knowledge needed to excel in roles such as cybersecurity analyst, ethical hacker, security consultant, and more.

 

 

Don't miss out on this opportunity to launch your cybersecurity career with confidence. Join us and A7 Security Hunters on a journey towards a brighter, more secure future. Enroll today and unlock the door to exciting job opportunities in the world of cybersecurity!

 

 

 

We will cover a total 12 levels in this cybersecurity diploma course.

 

Level 1 - Networking

 

Networking concepts are fundamental to cybersecurity courses as they provide the foundational understanding of how data moves across systems and networks, which is crucial for securing them effectively. Here's an overview of networking topics commonly covered in cybersecurity courses:

 

Network Architecture: Understanding the basic layout and components of networks, including nodes (devices such as computers, servers, routers), communication links (wired or wireless connections), and network topologies (how devices are interconnected).

 

OSI Model: The OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) model is a conceptual framework that standardizes the communication functions of a telecommunication or computing system into seven layers. These layers include the Physical, Data Link, Network, Transport, Session, Presentation, and Application layers. Understanding this model helps in comprehending how data flows through a network and where security measures can be applied.

 

 

TCP/IP Protocols: The TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) suite is the standard set of protocols used for communication on the internet and most networks. Understanding protocols like TCP, UDP, IP, ICMP, and ARP is essential for analyzing network traffic and identifying potential security threats.

 

 

Network Addressing: Knowledge of IP addressing (IPv4 and IPv6) and subnetting is crucial for configuring and securing network devices. This includes understanding IP address classes, subnet masks, CIDR notation, and techniques like Network Address Translation (NAT).

 

Routing and Switching: Understanding how routers and switches forward data packets within a network is essential for designing secure network architectures. Topics include routing protocols (e.g., OSPF, BGP), switching techniques (e.g., VLANs), and router/switch configuration.

 

 

Firewalls and Network Security Devices: Firewalls are essential components of network security that control incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules. Students learn about different types of firewalls (e.g., stateful, next-generation), intrusion detection/prevention systems (IDS/IPS), and other network security devices (e.g., VPN concentrators, proxy servers).

 

 

Wireless Security: As wireless networks become ubiquitous, understanding the security challenges associated with Wi-Fi networks is essential. Topics include encryption protocols (e.g., WPA2, WPA3), authentication mechanisms (e.g., WPA2-PSK, WPA2-Enterprise), and wireless security best practices.

 

 

Network Protocols and Vulnerabilities: Studying common network protocols (e.g., DNS, HTTP, FTP) helps students identify potential vulnerabilities and attacks targeting these protocols (e.g., DNS spoofing, HTTP session hijacking).

 

 

Network Monitoring and Analysis: Learning how to monitor network traffic using tools like Wireshark and analyzing packet captures helps students detect anomalous behavior and security incidents on the network.

 

 

Secure Network Design: Finally, cybersecurity courses often cover principles of secure network design, including defense-in-depth strategies, segmentation, least privilege, and other best practices for building resilient and secure networks.

 

By mastering these networking concepts, cybersecurity professionals can better understand the underlying infrastructure they are tasked with protecting, enabling them to implement effective security measures and respond to threats more efficiently.

 

 

 

Level 2: Linux Essentials

 

Linux is an integral part of cybersecurity education and practice for several reasons:

 

Open Source Nature: Linux is an open-source operating system, which means its source code is freely available for anyone to view, modify, and distribute. This openness fosters a vibrant community of developers and security experts who collaborate to improve the security of the Linux kernel and associated software. Studying Linux gives cybersecurity students insight into the inner workings of an operating system, helping them understand security concepts at a deeper level.

 

Commonly Used Platforms: Many cybersecurity tools and platforms are built on top of Linux, making it essential for professionals in the field to have proficiency in using Linux-based systems. Tools like Kali Linux, Parrot Security OS, and BackBox are specifically designed for penetration testing, digital forensics, and security auditing purposes, and they are widely used by cybersecurity professionals.

 

 

Command Line Interface (CLI) Skills: Linux systems predominantly use a command-line interface (CLI), which requires users to enter commands to perform tasks. Proficiency in the Linux command line is crucial for cybersecurity professionals, as many security tools and tasks are executed via the command line. By learning Linux, students develop essential CLI skills, including file manipulation, process management, network configuration, and package management.

 

Customization and Flexibility: Linux offers unparalleled customization and flexibility, allowing users to tailor their systems to meet specific security requirements. Cybersecurity professionals often use Linux distributions like Debian, Ubuntu, or CentOS as the base for building custom security appliances, network monitoring systems, and specialized security environments.

 

 

Security Features: Linux is renowned for its robust security features, including user access controls, file permissions, process isolation, and built-in security mechanisms like SELinux (Security-Enhanced Linux) and AppArmor. Understanding how to configure and leverage these security features is essential for securing Linux systems and infrastructure.

 

 

Networking Capabilities: Linux provides powerful networking capabilities, making it well-suited for tasks like network monitoring, packet analysis, intrusion detection, and firewall configuration. Many networking tools and utilities used in cybersecurity, such as Wireshark, nmap, tcpdump, and iptables, are available on Linux platforms.

 

 

Virtualization and Containerization: Linux-based technologies like KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine), Docker, and LXC (Linux Containers) are widely used for virtualization and containerization, allowing cybersecurity professionals to create isolated environments for testing, malware analysis, and sandboxing.

 

 

Scripting and Automation: Linux systems support a wide range of scripting languages, including Bash, Python, Perl, and Ruby, which are invaluable for automating tasks, writing custom security scripts, and developing security tools. Proficiency in scripting and automation enhances the efficiency and effectiveness of cybersecurity operations.

 

 

In summary, Linux is a cornerstone of cybersecurity education and practice due to its open-source nature, widespread adoption, powerful command-line interface, robust security features, networking capabilities, and support for virtualization, scripting, and automation. Mastery of Linux is essential for cybersecurity professionals seeking to excel in the field and secure complex IT environments effectively.

 

 

 

 

Level 3: Python

 

Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in cybersecurity due to its versatility, simplicity, and extensive libraries. Here's how Python is used in various aspects of cybersecurity:

 

Scripting and Automation: Python's readability and ease of use make it ideal for writing scripts to automate repetitive tasks in cybersecurity operations. From network scanning and log analysis to system configuration and vulnerability assessment, Python scripts can streamline workflows, save time, and reduce human error.

 

 

Penetration Testing: Python is widely used in penetration testing tools and frameworks like Metasploit, Scapy, and pwntools. Security professionals leverage Python's networking libraries and capabilities to develop custom exploits, payloads, and reconnaissance scripts for assessing the security of systems and networks.

 

 

Web Application Security: Python's web frameworks, such as Django and Flask, are commonly used to develop and secure web applications. Security analysts and developers use Python to implement secure coding practices, perform input validation, sanitize user inputs, and mitigate common web vulnerabilities like SQL injection, Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), and Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF).

 

 

Forensics and Incident Response: Python is employed in digital forensics and incident response tasks to analyze and extract information from digital evidence. Security professionals use Python scripts and libraries to parse log files, extract metadata from files, recover deleted data, and conduct memory analysis.

 

 

Malware Analysis: Python is a popular choice for malware analysis due to its versatility and extensive libraries for working with binary data, file formats, and network traffic. Security researchers and analysts use Python scripts to dissect malware samples, analyze behavior, extract indicators of compromise (IOCs), and develop detection signatures.

 

 

Data Analysis and Visualization: Python's data analysis libraries, such as Pandas, NumPy, and Matplotlib, are valuable for analyzing security data, such as logs, packet captures, and vulnerability scans. Security professionals use Python to perform statistical analysis, visualize trends, and identify patterns indicative of security incidents or anomalies.

 

 

Machine Learning and AI: Python's ecosystem includes powerful machine learning and artificial intelligence libraries like TensorFlow, scikit-learn, and PyTorch. Security practitioners leverage these libraries to develop predictive models for detecting and classifying security threats, identifying malicious activity in network traffic, and enhancing cybersecurity defenses.

 

 

Security Tool Development: Python is used to develop custom security tools, utilities, and plugins tailored to specific cybersecurity requirements. Whether it's building a custom vulnerability scanner, a network intrusion detection system (NIDS), or a threat intelligence platform, Python's flexibility and extensive libraries make it a preferred choice for tool development.

 

 

In summary, Python is widely used in cybersecurity for scripting and automation, penetration testing, web application security, forensics and incident response, malware analysis, data analysis and visualization, machine learning and AI, and security tool development. Its versatility, simplicity, and rich ecosystem of libraries make it an invaluable asset for cybersecurity professionals seeking to defend against evolving threats and secure digital assets effectively.

 

 

 

 

 

Level 4: Ethical Hacking

 

An ethical hacking course, also known as a penetration testing course, is designed to equip individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to identify and exploit security vulnerabilities in systems, networks, and applications with the permission of the owner, for the purpose of improving security. Here's how an ethical hacking course can help in cybersecurity:

 

Understanding Attacker's Perspective: Ethical hacking courses provide insights into the techniques and methodologies used by malicious hackers to compromise systems and networks. By understanding how attackers think and operate, cybersecurity professionals can better anticipate and defend against potential threats.

 

 

Identifying Vulnerabilities: Ethical hacking courses teach students how to identify common security vulnerabilities, such as misconfigurations, software flaws, weak authentication mechanisms, and insecure network protocols. Students learn how to conduct comprehensive security assessments and penetration tests to uncover vulnerabilities before malicious actors can exploit them.

 

 

Hands-On Experience: Ethical hacking courses typically include hands-on labs and exercises where students apply theoretical knowledge in real-world scenarios. These practical experiences enable students to develop practical skills in exploiting vulnerabilities, analyzing attack techniques, and using security tools effectively.

 

 

Security Tool Proficiency: Ethical hacking courses cover a wide range of security tools and techniques used in penetration testing and vulnerability assessment. Students learn how to use tools like Metasploit, Nmap, Wireshark, Burp Suite, and Hydra to conduct various stages of the hacking process, from reconnaissance to exploitation and post-exploitation.

 

 

Risk Assessment and Management: Ethical hacking courses emphasize the importance of risk assessment and management in cybersecurity. Students learn how to prioritize security vulnerabilities based on their impact and likelihood of exploitation, enabling organizations to allocate resources effectively to mitigate the most critical risks.

 

 

Compliance and Regulatory Requirements: Ethical hacking courses educate students about industry standards, best practices, and regulatory requirements related to cybersecurity, such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Understanding these requirements helps organizations ensure compliance and avoid costly fines and penalties.

 

 

Incident Response Preparedness: Ethical hacking courses cover incident response procedures and techniques for handling security incidents effectively. Students learn how to detect and respond to security breaches, contain the impact of an attack, preserve evidence for forensic analysis, and restore affected systems and services.

 

 

Ethical and Legal Considerations: Ethical hacking courses emphasize the importance of ethical and legal conduct in cybersecurity. Students learn about ethical guidelines, professional codes of conduct, and legal frameworks governing penetration testing and vulnerability

 

assessment activities. By adhering to ethical principles and legal requirements, cybersecurity professionals can conduct their work responsibly and ethically.

 

 

In summary, an ethical hacking course provides valuable knowledge, skills, and practical experience that are essential for cybersecurity professionals seeking to protect organizations from cyber threats effectively. By learning how to identify vulnerabilities, exploit security weaknesses, and mitigate risks, graduates of ethical hacking courses play a crucial role in safeguarding digital assets and maintaining the security and integrity of information systems.

 

 

 

 

 

Level 5: Penetration Testing

 

Completing a penetration testing course can significantly enhance your qualifications and employability in the field of cybersecurity. Here's how such a course can help you secure a job in cybersecurity:

 

Specialized Skills: Penetration testing courses provide specialized training in identifying, exploiting, and mitigating security vulnerabilities. By mastering techniques used by malicious hackers, such as reconnaissance, social engineering, and exploitation, you gain valuable skills that are highly sought after by employers.

 

 

Hands-On Experience: Penetration testing courses typically include hands-on labs and exercises that simulate real-world scenarios. This practical experience allows you to apply theoretical knowledge in a controlled environment, gaining confidence and proficiency in using security tools and techniques effectively.

 

 

Industry-Recognized Certifications: Many penetration testing courses offer the opportunity to earn industry-recognized certifications, such as Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP), or CompTIA PenTest+. These certifications validate your expertise and demonstrate to employers that you have the necessary skills to perform penetration testing and vulnerability assessments.

 

 

Career Advancement: Completing a penetration testing course can open up new career opportunities and pathways for advancement in cybersecurity. Penetration testers are in high demand across various industries, including finance, healthcare, technology, and government, allowing you to pursue roles such as penetration tester, security consultant, red team member, or security analyst.

 

 

Demonstrated Commitment to Security: Employers value candidates who demonstrate a commitment to cybersecurity and continuous learning. Completing a penetration testing course shows that you are proactive about enhancing your skills and staying current with emerging threats and technologies, making you a desirable candidate for cybersecurity positions.

 

 

Networking Opportunities: Penetration testing courses often provide opportunities to connect with industry professionals, mentors, and peers through forums, discussion groups, and networking events. Building relationships with others in the cybersecurity community can lead to job referrals, mentorship opportunities, and valuable insights into the industry.

 

 

Practical Application of Knowledge: Penetration testing courses teach you how to think like an attacker and approach security from an offensive perspective. This mindset shift not only improves your ability to identify and address security vulnerabilities but also enhances your problem-solving skills and critical thinking abilities, which are highly valued in cybersecurity roles.

 

 

Client Confidence: Employers and clients often require assurance that their systems and networks are secure from cyber threats. By completing a penetration testing course and earning relevant certifications, you demonstrate to employers and clients that you have the expertise and qualifications to assess and improve their security posture, instilling confidence in your abilities.

 

 

In summary, completing a penetration testing course can greatly enhance your prospects for landing a job in cybersecurity by providing specialized skills, hands-on experience, industry-recognized certifications, career advancement opportunities, networking connections, practical knowledge application, and client confidence. By investing in your education and skill development, you can position yourself as a competitive candidate in the cybersecurity job market and make meaningful contributions to securing digital assets and information systems.

 

 

 

 

 

Level 6: Cyber Forensics Investigation

 

 

Cyber forensics investigation plays a critical role in cybersecurity courses by providing students with the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, collect, preserve, analyze, and present digital evidence related to cybercrimes and security incidents. Here's how cyber forensics investigation contributes to cybersecurity education:

 

Digital Evidence Handling: Cyber forensics courses teach students how to handle digital evidence in a forensically sound manner to ensure its integrity, reliability, and admissibility in legal proceedings. Students learn best practices for collecting, preserving, and documenting evidence to maintain chain of custody and avoid contamination.

 

 

Incident Response: Cyber forensics investigation is an essential component of incident response procedures. Students learn how to respond to security incidents effectively by conducting forensic analysis to identify the cause, scope, and impact of an incident, enabling organizations to contain and mitigate the damage promptly.

 

 

Malware Analysis: Cyber forensics courses cover techniques and methodologies for analyzing malicious software (malware) to understand its behavior, functionality, and impact on systems and networks. Students learn how to extract and analyze malware samples, reverse-engineer code, and identify indicators of compromise (IOCs) to enhance threat detection and response capabilities.

 

 

Data Recovery and Reconstruction: Cyber forensics investigation involves recovering and reconstructing digital data from various sources, such as hard drives, memory dumps, network traffic, and cloud storage. Students learn how to use forensic tools and techniques to recover deleted files, carve out relevant artifacts, and reconstruct timelines of events to support investigations.

 

 

Network Forensics: Cyber forensics courses cover techniques for analyzing network traffic and logs to investigate security incidents and identify unauthorized activities. Students learn how to use packet capture tools, intrusion detection systems (IDS), and network forensic analysis tools to trace network activity, detect intrusions, and attribute malicious behavior.

 

 

Legal and Ethical Considerations: Cyber forensics investigation courses educate students about the legal and ethical aspects of conducting digital investigations. Students learn about relevant laws, regulations, and standards governing digital evidence, privacy rights, and chain of custody. Understanding legal and ethical considerations is essential for ensuring that investigations are conducted lawfully and ethically.

 

 

Courtroom Testimony: Cyber forensics investigation courses prepare students to testify as expert witnesses in legal proceedings. Students learn how to prepare forensic reports, present findings, and provide expert testimony in court or other legal forums, helping to establish the credibility and reliability of digital evidence.

 

 

Prevention and Remediation: Cyber forensics investigation provides valuable insights into security weaknesses and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by attackers. By analyzing security incidents and digital evidence, students gain a deeper understanding of common attack vectors and security best practices, enabling organizations to implement proactive security measures and remediate vulnerabilities effectively.

 

 

In summary, cyber forensics investigation is a crucial component of cybersecurity education, providing students with the knowledge, skills, and practical experience necessary to investigate security incidents, analyze digital evidence, and support legal proceedings. By mastering cyber forensics techniques, students can contribute to improving incident response capabilities, enhancing threat detection and mitigation, and strengthening overall cybersecurity posture.

 

 

 

 

 

Level 7: Web Application Security

 

Web application security is the practice of protecting web applications from security threats and vulnerabilities that can compromise the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data and resources. With the increasing reliance on web applications for various functions, ensuring their security is essential to prevent unauthorized access, data breaches, and other malicious activities. Here's an overview of web application security:

 

Common Threats and Vulnerabilities: Web applications are susceptible to a wide range of security threats and vulnerabilities, including:

 

 

Injection Attacks: Such as SQL injection, Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), and Command Injection, where attackers exploit input validation flaws to execute malicious code.

 

 

Authentication and Session Management Issues: Including weak passwords, predictable session tokens, and insufficient authentication mechanisms, which can lead to unauthorized access.

 

 

Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF): Where attackers trick users into executing malicious actions on authenticated web applications without their consent.

 

 

Security Misconfigurations: Such as default settings, unnecessary services, and improper access controls, which expose sensitive data and resources.

 

 

Broken Access Controls: Allowing unauthorized users to access restricted functionality or data within the application.

Insecure Direct Object References (IDOR): Allowing attackers to manipulate object references to access unauthorized data.

 

 

Insecure Deserialization: Where untrusted data is deserialized in a way that leads to remote code execution or other security risks.

 

 

Security Best Practices: To mitigate these threats and vulnerabilities, web application security relies on a combination of

 

preventive measures, including:

Input Validation and Output Encoding: Validating and sanitizing user input to prevent injection attacks and encoding output to prevent XSS attacks.

 

 

Authentication and Authorization Controls: Implementing strong authentication mechanisms, multi-factor authentication (MFA), and role-based access controls (RBAC) to enforce access policies.

 

 

Secure Session Management: Using secure session tokens, implementing session timeouts, and protecting session data from tampering and session fixation attacks.

 

 

HTTPS Encryption: Encrypting data in transit using HTTPS (HTTP Secure) to protect sensitive information from eavesdropping and man-in-the-middle attacks.

 

 

Content Security Policy (CSP): Defining and enforcing policies to restrict the sources of content that the web application can load, reducing the risk of XSS attacks.

 

 

Security Headers: Implementing security headers, such as X-Content-Type-Options, X-Frame-Options, and X-XSS-Protection, to mitigate various security risks.

 

 

Regular Security Testing: Conducting regular security assessments, including vulnerability scanning, penetration testing, and code reviews, to identify and remediate security weaknesses.

 

 

Secure Development Lifecycle (SDLC): Integrating security into the software development process from design to deployment, including threat modeling, security requirements, and secure coding practices.

 

 

Web Application Firewall (WAF): WAF is a security device or service that monitors and filters HTTP traffic between a web application and the internet, providing an additional layer of defense against common web application attacks.

 

 

Security Frameworks and Libraries: Leveraging security frameworks and libraries, such as OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project) Top 10, SANS (SysAdmin, Audit, Network, Security) Top 25, and security-focused libraries like OWASP ESAPI (Enterprise Security API), to implement security controls and best practices effectively.

 

 

Continuous Monitoring and Response: Implementing continuous monitoring solutions to detect and respond to security incidents in real-time, including intrusion detection systems (IDS), security information and event management (SIEM) systems, and web application security scanners.

 

 

In summary, web application security is essential for protecting web applications from a wide range of security threats and vulnerabilities. By implementing security best practices, leveraging security controls and technologies, and conducting regular security assessments, organizations can reduce the risk of security breaches and safeguard sensitive data and resources effectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level 8: Mobile Application Security

 

 

Mobile application testing plays a crucial role in cybersecurity by identifying and mitigating security vulnerabilities and weaknesses in mobile applications before they are deployed to users. Here are some ways in which mobile application testing contributes to cybersecurity:

 

Identifying Security Vulnerabilities: Mobile application testing helps identify security vulnerabilities and weaknesses in mobile apps that could be exploited by attackers. Common vulnerabilities include insecure data storage, improper session management, insufficient authentication and authorization controls, and insecure communication channels. By identifying these vulnerabilities early in the development lifecycle, organizations can address them before the application is released to users, reducing the risk of security breaches.

 

 

Ensuring Compliance with Security Standards: Mobile application testing helps ensure that mobile apps comply with industry standards, regulations, and best practices for security. This includes standards such as the OWASP Mobile Top 10, the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), and regulations like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). By conducting comprehensive security testing, organizations can verify that their mobile apps meet the necessary security requirements and protect sensitive data from unauthorized access and disclosure.

 

 

Enhancing User Trust and Confidence: Mobile application testing helps enhance user trust and confidence by ensuring that mobile apps are secure and free from vulnerabilities. Users are increasingly concerned about the security and privacy of their personal information when using mobile apps, particularly those that handle sensitive data such as financial information or personal health information. By conducting thorough security testing, organizations can demonstrate their commitment to protecting user data and building secure mobile apps, which can help attract and retain customers.

 

 

Preventing Data Breaches and Security Incidents: Mobile application testing helps prevent data breaches and security incidents by identifying and mitigating security vulnerabilities before they can be exploited by attackers. Data breaches can have serious consequences for organizations, including financial losses, damage to reputation, and legal liabilities. By proactively testing mobile apps for security vulnerabilities, organizations can reduce the risk of data breaches and protect sensitive information from unauthorized access and disclosure.

 

 

Supporting Secure Development Practices: Mobile application testing supports secure development practices by providing feedback to developers on security vulnerabilities and weaknesses in their code. This feedback helps developers understand the security implications of their coding decisions and learn how to write more secure code in the future. By integrating security testing into the development process, organizations can foster a culture of security awareness and promote secure coding practices among developers.

 

 

In summary, mobile application testing plays a critical role in cybersecurity by identifying and mitigating security vulnerabilities and weaknesses in mobile apps. By conducting thorough security testing, organizations can ensure that their mobile apps are secure, comply with security standards and regulations, enhance user trust and confidence, prevent data breaches and security incidents, and support secure development practices.

 

 

 

 

 

Level 9: IoT Pentesting

 

 

IoT (Internet of Things) penetration testing plays a crucial role in cybersecurity by identifying and addressing security vulnerabilities in IoT devices, networks, and ecosystems.

 

Here's how IoT penetration testing helps enhance cybersecurity:

 

Identifying Vulnerabilities: IoT penetration testing helps identify vulnerabilities and weaknesses in IoT devices, firmware, software, and communication protocols. Common vulnerabilities in IoT devices include default credentials, insecure network services, lack of encryption, and firmware vulnerabilities. By identifying these vulnerabilities through penetration testing, organizations can take proactive measures to address them before they are exploited by attackers.

 

 

Assessing Security Controls: IoT penetration testing assesses the effectiveness of security controls implemented in IoT devices and networks. This includes evaluating authentication mechanisms, access controls, encryption protocols, device management capabilities, and security configurations. By assessing security controls through penetration testing, organizations can identify gaps and weaknesses that may expose IoT devices to security risks.

 

 

Evaluating Network Security: IoT penetration testing evaluates the security of IoT networks, including wireless communication protocols (e.g., Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Zigbee), network segmentation, and traffic encryption. By simulating attacks on IoT networks, penetration testing helps identify vulnerabilities such as unauthorized access, man-in-the-middle attacks, and eavesdropping. This enables organizations to strengthen network security measures and protect IoT devices from unauthorized access and data breaches.

 

 

 

Testing Integration Points: IoT penetration testing tests the integration points between IoT devices, backend systems, cloud services, and third-party APIs. This includes assessing the security of data transmission, API endpoints, authentication mechanisms, and data storage practices. By testing integration points, organizations can identify vulnerabilities that may arise from insecure data exchanges or interactions between IoT devices and external systems.

 

 

 

Mitigating Risks: IoT penetration testing helps organizations mitigate security risks associated with IoT deployments. By identifying vulnerabilities and weaknesses, penetration testing provides actionable recommendations for improving the security posture of IoT devices and networks. This may include patching firmware vulnerabilities, strengthening authentication mechanisms, encrypting data in transit and at rest, and implementing network segmentation and access controls.

 

 

Compliance and Regulatory Requirements: IoT penetration testing helps organizations meet compliance and regulatory requirements related to cybersecurity. Many industry standards and regulations, such as the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, ISO/IEC 27001, and GDPR, require organizations to assess and mitigate security risks associated with IoT deployments. By conducting penetration testing, organizations can demonstrate compliance with these requirements and mitigate legal and regulatory liabilities.

 

 

Enhancing Security Awareness: IoT penetration testing raises awareness among stakeholders about the security risks associated with IoT deployments. By demonstrating the impact of security vulnerabilities through penetration testing, organizations can educate decision-makers, developers, and end-users about the importance of implementing security best practices in IoT environments. This helps foster a culture of security awareness and promotes proactive risk management strategies.

 

 

In summary, IoT penetration testing is essential for enhancing cybersecurity by identifying and addressing security vulnerabilities in IoT devices, networks, and ecosystems. By assessing security controls, evaluating network security, testing integration points, mitigating risks, ensuring compliance, and raising security awareness, penetration testing helps organizations strengthen the security posture of their IoT deployments and protect against emerging cyber threats.

 

 

 

 

Level 10: Endpoint Security

 

 

Endpoints play a crucial role in cybersecurity as they serve as the entry point for attackers to gain unauthorized access to networks and systems. Endpoint security focuses on protecting individual devices, such as desktops, laptops, servers, mobile devices, and IoT devices, from security threats and vulnerabilities.

 

Here's how endpoint security helps enhance cybersecurity:

 

Threat Detection and Prevention: Endpoint security solutions use various technologies, such as antivirus software, endpoint detection and response (EDR), and behavior-based analytics, to detect and prevent malware, ransomware, and other malicious threats from infecting endpoints. These solutions monitor endpoint activity in real-time, identify suspicious behavior, and take proactive measures to block or quarantine malicious files and processes.

 

 

Vulnerability Management: Endpoint security solutions help organizations identify and remediate vulnerabilities in endpoint systems and applications. By scanning endpoints for missing patches, outdated software, and misconfigurations, organizations can reduce the attack surface and prevent exploitation of known vulnerabilities by attackers. Vulnerability management processes also include patch management, software updates, and configuration management to keep endpoints secure and up-to-date.

 

 

Endpoint Encryption: Endpoint security solutions offer encryption capabilities to protect sensitive data stored on endpoints from unauthorized access and disclosure. Endpoint encryption ensures that data remains encrypted both at rest and in transit, even if the device is lost, stolen, or compromised. This helps organizations comply with data protection regulations and safeguard sensitive information from data breaches and insider threats.

 

 

Access Control and Authentication: Endpoint security solutions enforce access control policies and authentication mechanisms to prevent unauthorized users from accessing endpoints and sensitive resources. This includes implementing strong passwords, multi-factor authentication (MFA), and role-based access controls (RBAC) to verify the identity of users and restrict access to privileged functions and data. Endpoint security solutions also monitor user activity and enforce security policies based on user behavior and context.

 

 

Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR): EDR solutions provide advanced threat detection and response capabilities by continuously monitoring endpoint activity, detecting suspicious behavior and security incidents, and responding to threats in real-time. EDR solutions collect telemetry data from endpoints, analyze it for indicators of compromise (IOCs), and enable security teams to investigate and remediate security incidents quickly and efficiently.

 

 

Data Loss Prevention (DLP): Endpoint security solutions include DLP capabilities to prevent unauthorized data exfiltration and leakage from endpoints. DLP solutions monitor data movement and usage on endpoints, classify sensitive data, and enforce policies to prevent unauthorized access, copying, or transmission of sensitive information. DLP helps organizations protect intellectual property, customer data, and other confidential information from data breaches and compliance violations.

 

 

Endpoint Security Management: Endpoint security solutions provide centralized management capabilities to streamline the deployment, configuration, and monitoring of endpoint security controls. Endpoint security management platforms enable organizations to enforce security policies, monitor compliance, and respond to security incidents across their entire endpoint environment from a single console. This helps organizations improve operational efficiency, reduce management overhead, and maintain a consistent security posture across endpoints.

 

 

In summary, endpoint security plays a critical role in cybersecurity by protecting individual devices from security threats and vulnerabilities. By leveraging threat detection and prevention technologies, vulnerability management processes, endpoint encryption, access control mechanisms, EDR solutions, DLP capabilities, and centralized management platforms, organizations can strengthen the security posture of their endpoints and mitigate the risk of security breaches and data loss.

 

 

 

 

Level 11: AWS

 

Amazon Web Services (AWS) offers a wide range of cloud computing services that enable organizations to build, deploy, and manage applications and infrastructure in the cloud. While AWS provides robust security features and controls to protect its cloud services and resources, organizations must also implement additional security measures to ensure the security of their data, applications, and workloads in AWS.

 

 

Here's how AWS can help enhance cybersecurity:

 

 

Built-In Security Features: AWS offers a variety of built-in security features and controls that help organizations secure their cloud environments. These include:

 

 

Identity and Access Management (IAM): IAM allows organizations to manage user access to AWS services and resources securely. Organizations can create and manage user accounts, assign permissions using policies, and enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to protect user credentials.

 

 

Virtual Private Cloud (VPC): VPC enables organizations to create isolated networks within the AWS cloud, allowing them to define their network topology, configure security groups, and control inbound and outbound traffic using network access control lists (ACLs).

 

 

Encryption: AWS provides encryption capabilities to protect data at rest and in transit. Organizations can use AWS Key Management Service (KMS) to manage encryption keys, encrypt data stored in AWS services such as Amazon S3, Amazon RDS, and Amazon EBS, and use SSL/TLS encryption for data in transit.

 

 

Monitoring and Logging: AWS offers services like AWS CloudTrail, AWS Config, and Amazon CloudWatch for monitoring and logging activities within AWS environments. These services provide visibility into user actions, changes to AWS resources, and system performance, helping organizations detect and respond to security incidents effectively.

 

 

Security Groups and Network ACLs: AWS allows organizations to define security groups and network ACLs to control inbound and outbound traffic to their EC2 instances and other resources. Security groups act as firewalls at the instance level, while network ACLs provide subnet-level filtering.

 

 

DDoS Protection: AWS Shield provides protection against Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks by automatically detecting and mitigating large-scale attacks targeting AWS infrastructure and applications.

 

 

Compliance Certifications: AWS complies with various industry standards and regulations, including ISO 27001, SOC 1/2/3, PCI DSS, HIPAA, and GDPR. By leveraging AWS's compliance certifications, organizations can ensure that their cloud deployments meet regulatory requirements and industry best practices.

 

 

Security Services and Solutions: In addition to its built-in security features, AWS offers a wide range of security services and solutions that help organizations enhance their cybersecurity posture. These include:

 

 

AWS Security Hub: Security Hub provides a centralized view of security alerts and compliance status across AWS accounts and services. It aggregates findings from various AWS security services, such as Amazon GuardDuty, Amazon Inspector, and AWS Config, and provides actionable insights to help organizations prioritize and remediate security issues.

 

 

Amazon GuardDuty: GuardDuty is a threat detection service that continuously monitors AWS environments for malicious activity and unauthorized behavior. It uses machine learning algorithms and threat intelligence feeds to identify threats such as compromised instances, reconnaissance attempts, and cryptocurrency mining.

 

 

AWS WAF (Web Application Firewall): WAF helps protect web applications deployed on AWS against common web exploits and attacks, such as SQL injection, Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), and Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. Organizations can use WAF to create custom rules, block malicious traffic, and filter requests based on predefined conditions.

 

 

AWS Secrets Manager: Secrets Manager helps organizations securely store, rotate, and manage credentials, API keys, and other sensitive information used by applications and services deployed on AWS. It provides integration with AWS services like Amazon RDS, Amazon Redshift, and AWS Lambda, allowing applications to retrieve secrets securely at runtime.

 

 

AWS Key Management Service (KMS): KMS is a managed service that enables organizations to create and control encryption keys used to encrypt data stored in AWS services and applications. KMS integrates with various AWS services, allowing organizations to encrypt data with minimal impact on performance and scalability.

 

 

Security Best Practices and Guidelines: AWS provides documentation, best practices, and guidelines to help organizations implement security controls and configurations effectively in their AWS environments. This includes the AWS Well-Architected Framework, AWS Security Best Practices, and AWS Security Blog, which offer guidance on topics such as secure architecture design, data encryption, access control, and incident response.

 

 

Third-Party Integrations and Solutions: AWS integrates with a vast ecosystem of third-party security solutions and services that complement its native security offerings. Organizations can leverage third-party solutions for advanced threat detection, vulnerability management, security monitoring, and compliance automation to enhance their cybersecurity defenses in AWS.

 

 

In summary, AWS offers a comprehensive set of security features, services, and solutions that help organizations strengthen their cybersecurity posture in the cloud. By leveraging AWS's built-in security controls, security services, best practices, and third-party integrations, organizations can protect their data, applications, and workloads deployed in AWS environments from evolving cyber threats and compliance risks.

 

 

 

Level 12: AWS Cloud Security

 

AWS Cloud Security encompasses a comprehensive set of tools, technologies, and best practices designed to protect data, applications, and infrastructure deployed on the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud platform.

 

 

Here's an overview of AWS Cloud Security:

 

 

Shared Responsibility Model: AWS follows a shared responsibility model, where AWS is responsible for the security of the cloud infrastructure (such as data centers, networks, and hardware), while customers are responsible for securing their data, applications, identities, and configurations within the cloud. This model clarifies the division of security responsibilities between AWS and its customers, helping organizations understand and fulfill their security obligations effectively.

 

 

Identity and Access Management (IAM): AWS IAM allows organizations to manage user access to AWS services and resources securely. IAM enables organizations to create and manage IAM users and groups, assign granular permissions using policies, and enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to protect user credentials. IAM helps organizations enforce the principle of least privilege and ensure that only authorized users have access to resources.

 

 

Data Encryption: AWS offers encryption capabilities to protect data at rest and in transit. AWS Key Management Service (KMS) allows organizations to create and manage encryption keys used to encrypt data stored in AWS services such as Amazon S3, Amazon EBS, and Amazon RDS. AWS also supports SSL/TLS encryption for data in transit, ensuring that data is encrypted as it travels between AWS services and clients.

 

 

Network Security: AWS provides various network security features to protect data in transit and control access to resources. Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) enables organizations to create isolated networks within the AWS cloud, allowing them to define their network topology, configure security groups, and control inbound and outbound traffic using network access control lists (ACLs). AWS also offers services such as AWS WAF (Web Application Firewall) and AWS Shield for protecting web applications and mitigating DDoS attacks.

 

 

Logging and Monitoring: AWS offers services such as AWS CloudTrail, AWS Config, and Amazon CloudWatch for logging and monitoring activities within AWS environments. AWS CloudTrail provides a record of API calls made to AWS services, enabling organizations to audit user activity, track changes to AWS resources, and investigate security incidents. AWS Config helps organizations assess, audit, and evaluate the configuration of AWS resources for compliance and security best practices. Amazon CloudWatch provides real-time monitoring and alerts for AWS resources and applications, enabling organizations to detect and respond to security threats and performance issues proactively.

 

 

Security Compliance: AWS complies with various industry standards and regulations, including ISO 27001, SOC 1/2/3, PCI DSS, HIPAA, and GDPR. AWS provides compliance resources, documentation, and certifications to help organizations demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements and industry best practices. By leveraging certified AWS environments, organizations can inherit compliance controls and assurances, reducing the burden of compliance management and demonstrating adherence to regulatory requirements.

 

 

In summary, AWS Cloud Security offers a robust set of tools, technologies, and best practices to help organizations protect their data, applications, and infrastructure deployed on the AWS cloud platform. By leveraging AWS security features such as IAM, encryption, network security, logging and monitoring, and compliance certifications, organizations can strengthen their security posture, mitigate risks, and protect their assets from cyber threats effectively.

Course Info
Unlock the Secrets of Cybersecurity with Expert Guidance

Module 01: Introduction to Networking

ü Lesson 01: What is a Network?

ü Lesson 02: Local Area Network (LAN) Explained

ü Lesson 03: Wide Area Network (WAN) Explained

ü Lesson 04: Type of Mode

ü Lesson 05: Type of Communication

 

Module 02: Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Model

ü Lesson 01: What is Open Systems Interconnection (OSI)

ü Lesson 02: Why we Need Open Systems Interconnection (OSI)

ü Lesson 03: Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Layers

ü Lesson 04: Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) / User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

ü Lesson 05: 3 Way Hand Shake

 

Module 03: Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) / Internet Protocol (IP)

Model

ü Lesson 01: What is Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) / Internet Protocol (IP)

ü Lesson 02: Why we Need Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) / Internet Protocol (IP) Model

ü Lesson 03: Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) / Internet Protocol (IP) Layer

 

Module 04: Sub Netting / Summarisation

ü Lesson 01: Sub netting Explained

ü Lesson 02: Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR)

ü Lesson 03: Create Subnets

ü Lesson 04: Understanding Variable Length Subnet Masks (VLSM)

ü Lesson 05: Private Internet Protocol (IP) Addresses Explained

 

Module 05: Packet Flow in Same & Different Network

ü Lesson 01: What is Domain Name System (DNS) and How Does it Work?

ü Lesson 02: Map Hostnames to Internet Protocol (IP) Addresses

ü Lesson 03: Configure Cisco Device as Domain Name System (DNS) Client

ü Lesson 04: How to Configure a Cisco Router as a DNS Server?

ü Lesson 05: no Internet Protocol (IP) domain-lookup Command

ü Lesson 06: Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) Explained

ü Lesson 07: Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) Table on a Cisco Router

 

Module 06: Information about Networking Device

ü Lesson 01: Network Devices

ü Lesson 02: Network Hubs Explained

ü Lesson 03: Network Switch Explained

ü Lesson 04: Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA CD)

ü Lesson 05: Collision & Broadcast Domain

ü Lesson 06: How Switches Work

ü Lesson 07: Layer 2 Switching

ü Lesson 08: Network Router Explained

ü Lesson 09: What Is Layer 3 Switch and how it Works in Our Network?

 

Module 07: Internet Protocol (IP) / Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)

ü Lesson 01: Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)

ü Lesson 02: Ping Explained

ü Lesson 03: Extended Ping Command

ü Lesson 04: Traceroute Explained

ü Lesson 05: Traceroute Command

ü Lesson 06: Show processes Command

 

Module 08: Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)

ü Lesson 01: What is Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)

ü Lesson 02: Why we Need Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)

ü Lesson 03: Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)

 

Module 09: Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

ü Lesson 01: What is Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

ü Lesson 02: Why we Need Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

ü Lesson 03: Type of Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

 

Module 10: Routing Protocols (Static & Dynamic)

ü Lesson 01: Routing Protocols

ü Lesson 02: Comparing Internal Routing Protocols (IGPs)

ü Lesson 03: Administrative Distance & Metric

ü Lesson 04: Equal Cost Multi-Path (ECMP) Explanation & Configuration

ü Lesson 05: Understanding Loopback Interfaces and Loopback Addresses

ü Lesson 06: Passive-interface Command

 

Module 11: Static - Next Hop / Exit Interface

ü Lesson 01: What is IP Routing?

ü Lesson 02: Local Routes and How they Appear in the Routing Table

ü Lesson 03: Connected, Static, & Dynamic Routes

ü Lesson 04: Floating Static Route - Explanation and Configuration

ü Lesson 05: Default Static Route

ü Lesson 06: Create a Static Host Route

 

Module 12: Dynamic - RIP / EIGRP / OSPF & BGP

ü Lesson 01: OSPF Overview

ü Lesson 02: Differences Between OSPF and EIGRP

ü Lesson 03: Cisco Bandwidth Command vs Clock Rate and Speed Commands

ü Lesson 04: OSPF Cost - OSPF Routing Protocol Metric Explained

ü Lesson 05: OSPF Configuration

ü Lesson 06: Designated & Backup Designated Router

 

Module 13: WAN Technologies

ü Lesson 01: Wide Area Network

ü Lesson 02: Cisco VPN - What is VPN (Virtual Private Network)?

ü Lesson 03: WAN Connection Types - Explanation and Examples

ü Lesson 04: Leased Line Definition, Explanation, and Example

ü Lesson 05: Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Explained & Configured

 

Module 14: What is Network Address Translation (NAT)

ü Lesson 01: Static Network Address Translation (NAT)

ü Lesson 02: Dynamic Static Network Address Translation (NAT)

ü Lesson 03: Port Address Translation (PAT) Configuration

Module 15: Access Control List (ACL)

ü Lesson 01: What are Access Control List (ACL)?

ü Lesson 02: Types of Access Control List (ACL)

ü Lesson 03: Configuring Standard Access Control List (ACL)

ü Lesson 04: Configuring Extended Access Control List (ACL)

ü Lesson 05: Configuring Named Access Control List (ACL)

 

Module 16: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

ü Lesson 01: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) & Domain Name System (DNS)

ü Lesson 02: Configure Cisco Router as Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Server

ü Lesson 03: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Relay Agent

ü Lesson 04: Configure Cisco Router as a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Client

ü Lesson 05: Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)

 

Module 17: Telnet & Secure SHell (SSH)

ü Lesson 01: What is Telnet & Secure Shell (SSH)

ü Lesson 02: Why we Need Telnet & Secure Shell (SSH)

ü Lesson 03: Telnet & Secure Shell (SSH)

ü Lesson 04: Setting Up Telnet

ü Lesson 05: Setting Up Secure Shell (SSH)

 

Module 18: Load Balancing Protocol

ü Lesson 01: What is Network Redundancy and What are its Benefits?

ü Lesson 02: Cisco First Hop Redundancy Protocol (FHRP) Explained

ü Lesson 03: Cisco Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) Explained

ü Lesson 04: Cisco Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) Configuration

ü Lesson 05: Cisco Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) Preempt Command

 

Module 19: Layers 2 Protocols

ü Lesson 01: What is Layer 2

ü Lesson 02: Why we Need Layer 2 Protocol

ü Lesson 03: Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP)

ü Lesson 04: Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP)

 

Module 20: Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN)

ü Lesson 01: What is a Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN)?

ü Lesson 02: Configuring Access & Trunk Ports

ü Lesson 03: Configuring Voice Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN)

ü Lesson 04: Configuring Allowed Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN)

ü Lesson 05: Cisco Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) Explained

ü Lesson 06: What is Virtual Trunking Protocol (VTP)?

ü Lesson 07: Virtual Trunking Protocol (VTP) Modes

ü Lesson 08: Virtual Trunking Protocol (VTP) Configuration

 

Module 21: Different Types of Spanning Tree Priority (STP)

ü Lesson 01: Network Bridge Explained

ü Lesson 02: How Spanning Tree Priority (STP) Works

ü Lesson 03: Electing the Root Switch in Spanning Tree Priority (STP)

ü Lesson 04: Spanning Tree Priority: Root Primary and Root Secondary

ü Lesson 05: Selecting Spanning Tree Priority (STP) Root Port

ü Lesson 06: Selecting Spanning Tree Priority (STP) Designated Port (DP)

 

Module 22: Ether-Channel (L2)

ü Lesson 01: What is Ether Channel and Why Do We Need It?

ü Lesson 02: Ether Channel Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP)

ü Lesson 03: Ether Channel Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)

ü Lesson 04: Multi chassis Ether Channel (MEC) and its Options

ü Lesson 05: Cisco Layer 3 Ether Channel - Explanation and Configuration

 

Module 23: Port Security

ü Lesson 01: Cisco Console Port Security

ü Lesson 02: Exec-timeout Command

ü Lesson 03: Encrypt Local Usernames and Passwords

 

 

Level 2: Linux Essentials

 

Module 01: Getting Started with Red Hat Enterprise Linux

ü Lesson 01: What Is Linux?

 

Module 02: Accessing the Command Line

ü Lesson 01: Access the Command Line

ü Lesson 02: Access the Command Line with the Desktop

ü Lesson 03: Execute Commands with the Bash Shell

ü Lesson 04: Lab: Access the Command Line

 

Module 03: Managing Files from the Command Line

ü Lesson 01: Describe Linux file system Hierarchy Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Specify Files by Name

ü Lesson 03: Manage Files with Command-line Tools

ü Lesson 04: Make Links Between Files

ü Lesson 05: Match File Names with Shell Expansions

ü Lesson 06: Lab: Manage Files from the Command Line

 

Module 04: Getting Help in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

ü Lesson 01: Lab: Get Help in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

 

Module 05: Creating, Viewing & Editing Test Files

ü Lesson 01: Redirect Output to a File or Program

ü Lesson 02: Edit Text Files from the Shell Prompt

ü Lesson 03: Change the Shell Environment

ü Lesson 04: Lab: Create, View, and Edit Text Files

 

Module 06: Managing Local Users and Groups

ü Lesson 01: Describe User and Group Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Gain Superuser Access

ü Lesson 03: Manage Local User Accounts

ü Lesson 04: Manage Local Group Accounts

ü Lesson 05: Manage User Passwords

ü Lesson 06: Lab: Manage Local Users and Groups

 

Module 07: Controlling Access to Files

ü Lesson 01: Interpret Linux File System Permissions

ü Lesson 02: Manage File System Permissions from the Command Line

ü Lesson 03: Manage Default Permissions and File Access

ü Lesson 04: Lab: Control Access to Files

 

Module 08: Monitoring and Managing Linux Process

ü Lesson 01: Process States and Lifecycle

ü Lesson 02: Control Jobs

ü Lesson 03: Kill Processes

ü Lesson 04: Monitor Process Activity

ü Lesson 05: Lab: Monitor and Manage Linux Processes

 

Module 09: Controlling Services and Daemons

ü Lesson 01: Identify Automatically Started System Processes

ü Lesson 02: Control System Services

ü Lesson 03: Lab: Control Services and Daemons

 

Module 10: Configuring and Securing SSH

ü Lesson 01: Access the Remote Command Line with Secure Shell (SSH)

ü Lesson 02: Configure Secure Shell (SSH) Key-based Authentication

ü Lesson 03: Customize Open Secure Shell (SSH) Service Configuration

ü Lesson 04: Lab: Configure and Secure Shell (SSH)

 

Module 11: Analyzing and Storing Logs

ü Lesson 01: Describe System Log Architecture

ü Lesson 02: Review Syslog Files

ü Lesson 03: Review System Journal Entries

ü Lesson 04: Preserve the System Journal

ü Lesson 05: Maintain Accurate Time

ü Lesson 06: Lab: Analyze and Store Logs

 

Module 12: Managing Networking

ü Lesson 01: Describe Networking Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Validate Network Configuration

ü Lesson 03: Configure Networking from the Command Line

ü Lesson 04: Edit Network Configuration Files

ü Lesson 05: Configure Hostnames and Name Resolution

ü Lesson 06: Lab: Manage Networking

 

Module 13: Archiving and Transferring Files

ü Lesson 01: Manage Compressed tar Archives

ü Lesson 02: Transfer Files Between Systems Securely

ü Lesson 03: Synchronize Files Between Systems Securely

ü Lesson 04: Lab: Archive and Transfer Files

 

Module 14: Installing and Updating Software Packages

ü Lesson 01: Install and Update Software Packages

ü Lesson 02: Register Systems for Red Hat Support

ü Lesson 03: Explain and Investigate RPM Software Packages

ü Lesson 04: Install and Update Software Packages with Differential Network Flow (DNF)

ü Lesson 05: Enable Differential Network Flow (DNF) Software Repositories

ü Lesson 06: Lab: Install and Update Software Packages

 

Module 15: Accessing Linux File System

ü Lesson 01: Identify File Systems and Devices

ü Lesson 02: Mount and Unmount File Systems

ü Lesson 03: Locate Files on the System

ü Lesson 04: Lab: Access Linux File Systems

 

Module 16: Analyzing Servers and Getting Support

ü Lesson 01: Analyze and Manage Remote Servers

ü Lesson 02: Get Help From Red Hat Customer Portal

ü Lesson 03: Detect and Resolve Issues with Red Hat Insights

 

 

Level 3: Python Programming

 

Module 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 01: Programming language introduction

ü Lesson 02: Translators (Compiler, Interpreter and assembler)

ü Lesson 03: Uses of computer programs

ü Lesson 04: Algorithm

ü Lesson 05: Flow chart

 

Module 02: Python Introduction

ü Lesson 01: History

ü Lesson 02: Why python created

ü Lesson 03: Fields of use

ü Lesson 04: Use of Python in Cyber security

ü Lesson 05: Reasons for using python

ü Lesson 06: Syntax

ü Lesson 07: Installation of Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Pycharm / Visual studio

ü Lesson 08: Running a hello world program

 

Module 03: Comparison of Python with other Programming Language

ü Lesson 01: Python vs Java

ü Lesson 02: Python vs C++

 

Module 04: Data Type

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Discuss all data types

ü Lesson 03: Use type() to show dynamically typed language

 

Module 05: Variables

ü Lesson 01: What is variable

ü Lesson 02: Declaration rules

ü Lesson 03: Multiple variable declaration

ü Lesson 04: Valid and invalid variables

ü Lesson 05: Type casting

 

Module 06: String

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Declaration

ü Lesson 03: All Functions with examples

 

Module 07: Operators

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Arithmetic operators

ü Lesson 03: Assignment operators

ü Lesson 04: Comparison operators

ü Lesson 05: Logical operators

ü Lesson 06: Identity operator

ü Lesson 07: Bitwise operator

ü Lesson 08: Membership operator

 

Module 08: List

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Declaration

ü Lesson 03: All Functions with examples

 

Module 09: Tuple

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Declaration

ü Lesson 03: All Functions with examples

 

Module 10: Dictionary

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Declaration

ü Lesson 03: All Functions with examples

 

Module 11: Set

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Declaration

ü Lesson 03: All Functions with examples

 

Module 12: Conditional Statement

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: If introduction with examples

ü Lesson 03: If statement practice questions

ü Lesson 04: If- else introduction with examples

ü Lesson 05: If - else statement practice questions

ü Lesson 06: elif introduction with examples

ü Lesson 07: elif statement practice questions

ü Lesson 08: Nested if

ü Lesson 09: Short hand if- else

 

Module 13: Looping

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: While loop

ü Lesson 03: Introduce modules (pyautogui)

ü Lesson 04: While loop practice questions

ü Lesson 05: For loop introduction with examples

ü Lesson 06: For loop practice questions

ü Lesson 07: Nested loop

 

Module 14: Function

ü Lesson 01: Introduction function

ü Lesson 02: Declaration, calling of function

ü Lesson 03: Lambda function

ü Lesson 04: Filter

ü Lesson 05: Reduce function

ü Lesson 06: Map function

 

Module 15: File Handling

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Text file handling

ü Lesson 03: Binary file handling

 

Module 16: Python Array

ü Lesson 01: Array Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Array basic operations

ü Lesson 03: Array Function

 

Module 17: Object Oriented Programming (OOPs)

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Difference b/w procedural programming and Object Oriented Programming (OOPs)

ü Lesson 03: Class

ü Lesson 04: Object

ü Lesson 05: Encapsulation

ü Lesson 06: Inheritance

ü Lesson 07: Abstraction

ü Lesson 08: Polymorphism

 

Module 18: Date and Time

ü Lesson 01: Date and time function off date time module

 

Module 19: Web Scrapping

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Introduce basic html tags

ü Lesson 03: Introduction to requests library

ü Lesson 04: Introduction to bs4

ü Lesson 05: Scrapping through Beautiful Soup

 

Module 20: Network Interaction

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Client

ü Lesson 03: Server

ü Lesson 04: Port number

ü Lesson 05: IP

ü Lesson 06: Client - server connection with python code

 

Module 21: Tkinter

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming

ü Lesson 02: Widgets introduction and code

ü Lesson 03: Create Login form project

ü Lesson 04: Task Text to speech

 

Module 22: Database Connection

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to database

ü Lesson 02: Install My Structured Query Language (MySql)

ü Lesson 03: Explain basic query of sql

ü Lesson 04: Connection with python

ü Lesson 05: Execute some queries by python

 

Module 23: Multithreading

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Real life examples

ü Lesson 03: Perform operations over threads

 

Module 24: Mail Sending Program

ü Lesson 01: Python project to send email

ü Lesson 02: App password generating

ü Lesson 03: Sending email

 

Module 25: Python for Image Processing

ü Lesson 01: Using opencv library

ü Lesson 02: Accessing image

ü Lesson 03: Red Green Blue (Rgb) to Grayscale

ü Lesson 04: Resizing

ü Lesson 05: Filters

ü Lesson 06: Saving image

 

Module 26: Introduction to Machine Learning

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Steps to create Machine Learning (ML) Application

ü Lesson 03: Real examples of Machine Learning

 

Module 27: Introduction to Data Science

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Terminology used in Data Science

 

Module 28: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Artificial Intelligence (AI) Websites as example

 

 

Level 4: Ethical Hacking

 

Module 01: Introduction to Basics of Ethical Hacking

ü Lesson 01: Intro To Ethical Hacking

ü Lesson 02: Types of Attacks

ü Lesson 03: Hacking Methodology

ü Lesson 04: Cyber Kill Chain

ü Lesson 05: Types of Attackers

ü Lesson 06: Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability (CIA) Traid

ü Lesson 07: Risk Management

ü Lesson 08: Cyber Laws

 

Module 02: Foot-printing Active (Tool-Based Practical)

ü Lesson 01: What is Active Footprinting

ü Lesson 02: Different kinds of information gathered in Footprinting

ü Lesson 03: Tools for Active Footprinting = nmap, hping, Masscan

 

Module 03: Foot-printing Passive (Passive Approach)

ü Lesson 01: What is passive footprinting

ü Lesson 02: Footprinting Through Whois

ü Lesson 03: Footprinting Through Website / Web services

ü Lesson 04: Footprinting Through search engine

ü Lesson 05: Footprinting Through DNS

ü Lesson 06: Footprinting Through Email

ü Lesson 07: Footprinting Through Network

ü Lesson 08: Footprinting Through Social Media

ü Lesson 09: Tools for Passive Footprinting – Google dorks, shodan, netcraft

 

Module 04: In-depth Network Scanning

ü Lesson 01: Overview of Network Scanning

ü Lesson 02: Scanning Methodology

ü Lesson 03: Host Discovery

ü Lesson 04: Port Scanning Techniques

ü Lesson 05: Scanning tools – nmap, netdiscover, arp-scan -1

 

Module 05: Enumeration User Identification

ü Lesson 01: Enumeration Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Network Basic Input Output System (NetBIOS) Enumeration

ü Lesson 03: Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Enumeration

ü Lesson 04: Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) Enumeration

ü Lesson 05: Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) Enumeration

ü Lesson 06: Domain Name System (DNS) Enumeration

 

Module 06: System Hacking Password Cracking & Bypassing

ü Lesson 01: Authentication

ü Lesson 02: Gaining Access

ü Lesson 03: Password cracking

ü Lesson 04: Password Cracking Techniques

ü Lesson 05: Steganography

 

Module 07: Viruses and Worms

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Malware

ü Lesson 02: Types of Viruses

ü Lesson 03: Types of Worms

 

Module 08: Trojan and Back door

ü Lesson 01: Types of Trojans

ü Lesson 02: Components Of a Trojan

Module 09: Bots and Botnets

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Botnets

ü Lesson 02: Characteristics of Botnets

 

Module 10: Sniffers MITM with Kali

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Ettercap and Bettercap

ü Lesson 02: Practical on Ettercap

ü Lesson 03: Practical on Bettercap

 

Module 11: Sniffers MITM with Windows

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Wireshark

ü Lesson 02: Practical on Wireshark

 

Module 12: Social Engineering Techniques Theoretical Approach

ü Lesson 01: Types of Social Engineering Attacks

ü Lesson 02: Human Based Social Engineering Attacks

ü Lesson 03: Computer Based Social Engineering Attacks

ü Lesson 04: Mobile Based Social Engineering Attacks

 

Module 13: Social Engineering Toolkit Practical Based Approach

ü Lesson 01: Practical on zphisher

ü Lesson 02: Practical on Social Engineering Toolkit (SET)

 

Module 14: Denial of Service (DOS) & Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDOS)

Attacks

ü Lesson 01: Denial of Service (DOS) / Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDOS) Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Denial of Service (DOS) / Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDOS) Attack Techniques

ü Lesson 03: Denial of Service (DOS) / Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDOS) Tools

ü Lesson 04: Denial of Service (DOS) / Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDOS) Protection Tools and Techniques

 

Module 15: Web Session Hijacking

ü Lesson 01: Session Hijacking Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Session Hijacking Techniques

ü Lesson 03: Session Hijacking Tools

 

Module 16: SQL Injection Manual Testing

ü Lesson 01: SQL Injection Concept

ü Lesson 02: Types of SQL Injection

ü Lesson 03: Working Of SQL Injection

ü Lesson 04: SQL Injection Methodology

 

Module 17: SQL Injection Automated Tool-Based Testing

ü Lesson 01: Practical on sqlmap

ü Lesson 02: Practical on Ghauri

 

Module 18: Basics of Web App Security

ü Lesson 01: Fundamentals of Web Application Security

ü Lesson 02: Common Vulnerabilities in Web Applications

ü Lesson 03: Best Practices for Web App Security

 

Module 19: Hacking Web servers

ü Lesson 01: Web Server Hacking Techniques

ü Lesson 02: Server Rooting Methods

ü Lesson 03: Securing Web servers

 

Module 20: Hacking Wireless Networks Manual CLI Based

ü Lesson 01: Wireless Network Basics

ü Lesson 02: Manual Hacking Techniques for Wi-Fi Networks

ü Lesson 03: Command Line Tools for Wireless Hacking

 

Module 21: Hacking Wireless Network

ü Lesson 01: Automated Wireless Hacking Tools

ü Lesson 02: Wireless Network Exploitation Methods

ü Lesson 03: Wireless Security Best Practices

 

Module 22: Evading IDS, Firewall

ü Lesson 01: Intrusion Detection System (IDS) Evasion Techniques

ü Lesson 02: Firewall Evasion Methods

ü Lesson 03: Stealth and Evasion Tools

 

Module 23: Honey pots

ü Lesson 01: Introduction on Honeypots

ü Lesson 02: Types Of Honeypots

ü Lesson 03: Install Of Honeypot (KF Sensor)

 

Module 24: Buffer Overflow

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Buffer Overflow

 

Module 25: Cryptography

ü Lesson 01: What is cryptography, encryption, decryption

ü Lesson 02: Types of cipher – substitution (Caesar) and Transposition (rail fence) techniques

ü Lesson 03: Keys in cryptography – asymmetric and symmetric

ü Lesson 04: What is encoding

ü Lesson 05: Example of encoding

ü Lesson 06: What is hashing

ü Lesson 07: Example of hashes of a string

 

Module 26: Penetration Testing: Basics

ü Lesson 01: Penetration Testing Overview

ü Lesson 02: Phases of Penetration Testing

ü Lesson 03: Reporting and Remediation

 

Module 27: Mobile Hacking

ü Lesson 01: Mobile Security Threats

ü Lesson 02: Exploiting Mobile Platforms

ü Lesson 03: Theory of mobile and mobile attacks

ü Lesson 04: Practical of Androrat

 

Module 28: Internet of Things (IoT) Hacking

ü Lesson 01: Internet of Things (IoT) Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Internet of Things (IoT) Hacking Methodology

ü Lesson 03: Internet of Things (IoT) Hacking Tools

ü Lesson 04: Internet of Things (IoT) Security Tools

 

Module 29: Cloud Security and many more

ü Lesson 01: Cloud Computing Concepts

ü Lesson 02: Cloud Computing Threats

ü Lesson 03: Cloud Computing Attacks

ü Lesson 04: Cloud Security Tools

 

Level 5: Advanced Penetration Testing

 

Module 01: Introduction to Penetration Testing

ü Lesson 01: What is Advanced Penetration Testing (APT)

ü Lesson 02: Types of Penetration Testing & Areas

ü Lesson 03: Demo Report Understanding

 

Module 02: In-Depth Scanning

ü Lesson 01 : Scan All Top 20 Ports

 

Module 03: Exploitation

ü Lesson 01: Basics of Exploitations

 

Module 04: Command Line Fun

ü Lesson 01: Basic of Linux Commands

ü Lesson 02: Permission Commands

 

Module 05: Getting Comfortable with Kali Linux

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Kali Linux

 

Module 06: Bash Scripting

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Bash Scripting

ü Lesson 02: Bash Scripting Fundamentals

ü Lesson 03: Tool Creation - Password Generator

ü Lesson 04: Functions

 

Module 07: Practical Tools

ü Lesson 01: Essential Tools

 

Module 08: Active Information Gathering

ü Lesson 01: Domain Name System (DNS) Enumerations

ü Lesson 02: Automating Lookups

ü Lesson 03: Domain Name System (DNS) Zone Transfers

ü Lesson 04: NMAP and Masscan

ü Lesson 05: Port Enumeration

 

Module 09: Passive Information Gathering

ü Lesson 01: Website Recon

ü Lesson 02: Netcraft, Shodan, Email Harvesting

ü Lesson 03: Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) Framework

 

Module 10: Introduction to Buffer Overflows

ü Lesson 01: Introduction of Buffer Over Flow (BOF)

ü Lesson 02: Basic Data Structure Understanding

ü Lesson 03: Types of Buffer Over Flow BOF

 

Module 11: Buffer Overflows

ü Lesson 01: Capture the Flag (CTF) on Buffer Over Flow (BOF)

 

Module 12: Fixing Exploits

ü Lesson 01: Capture the Flag (CTF) on Fixing Exploits

 

Module 13: Locating Public Exploits

ü Lesson 01: Find Exploits on Google Hacking Database

ü Lesson 02: Find Exploits on GitHub

 

Module 14: Antivirus Evasion

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Antivirus Evasion

ü Lesson 02: Working of Antivirus Evasion

ü Lesson 03: Obfuscation Techniques

 

Module 15: File Transfers

ü Lesson 01: File Transfers Using FTP, Telnet, SSH, PHP, Python

Module 16: Windows Privilege Escalation

ü Lesson 01: Service Exploits - Insecure Service Permissions

ü Lesson 02: Service Exploits - Unquoted Service Path

ü Lesson 03: Service Exploits - Weak Registry Permissions

ü Lesson 04: Service Exploits - Insecure Service Executables

ü Lesson 05: Registry – Auto Runs, etc.

 

Module 17: Linux Privilege Escalation

ü Lesson 01: Service Exploits

ü Lesson 02: Weak File Permissions - Readable /etc/shadow

ü Lesson 03: Weak File Permissions - Writable /etc/shadow

ü Lesson 04: Weak File Permissions - Writable /etc/passwd

ü Lesson 05: Sudo - Shell Escape Sequences, etc.

 

Module 18: Password Attacks

ü Lesson 01: Password Spraying and Dictionary Attack

 

Module 19: Port Redirection and Tunneling

ü Lesson 01: Port Redirection and Tunneling Using Chisel

 

Module 20: Active Directory Attacks

ü Lesson 01: Introduction of Active Directory (AD)

ü Lesson 02: Basics of Active Directory (AD)

ü Lesson 03: Enumeration of Active Directory (AD)

 

Module 21: Power Shell Empire

ü Lesson 01: Introduction of Empire

ü Lesson 02: Getting Shell Using Empire

 

Module 22: Trying Harder: The Labs

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Penetration Testing Labs

ü Lesson 02: Hands-On Practice

 

Module 23: Penetration Test Breakdown

ü Lesson 01: Understanding Penetration Test Reports

ü Lesson 02: Debriefing and Recommendations

 

Module 24: Report Writing

ü Lesson 01: Proof of Concept (POC)

ü Lesson 02: Executive and Management Report

ü Lesson 03: Technical Report For IT and security Department

 

Level 6: Cyber Forensics Investigation

 

Module 01: Computer Forensics in Today’s World

ü Lesson 01: Understanding the cyber crime

ü Lesson 02: Understanding cyber law

ü Lesson 03: Common attack

ü Lesson 04: Digital evidence

ü Lesson 05: Types Digital forensic

ü Lesson 06: Challenge in cybercrime investigation

 

Module 02: Computer Forensics Investigation Process

ü Lesson 01: Rules of Digital forensic investigation

ü Lesson 02: Chain of custody, Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)

ü Lesson 03: Lab work, Crime Scene Investigation (CSI), about Raids, Incident response

ü Lesson 04: Checklist to prepare before the investigation.

ü Lesson 05: Precaution during search and seizure

ü Lesson 06: Equipment’s and tools software/hardware based

 

Module 03: Understanding Hard Disks and File Systems

ü Lesson 01: Hard disk design and architecture

ü Lesson 02: Various File systems

ü Lesson 03: Understanding booting process

ü Lesson 04: Window & Linux File system

 

Module 04: Data Acquisition and Duplication

ü Lesson 01: Understanding the concept of data acquisition

ü Lesson 02: Rules of data acquisitions

ü Lesson 03: Types of data acquisitions

ü Lesson 04: Live & Dead acquisitions

ü Lesson 05: Data acquisition Format

ü Lesson 06: Live and dead acquisition on window & Linux

 

Module 05: Defeating Anti-Forensics Techniques

ü Lesson 01: Insight of anti-forensic technique

ü Lesson 02: Steganography pros & cons

ü Lesson 03: Types of Steganography

ü Lesson 04: Basic stenographic model

ü Lesson 05: Data sanitization by hardware and software tools

ü Lesson 06: Password cracking technique

ü Lesson 07: Deleted data recovery

ü Lesson 08: Encryption methods

 

Module 06: Windows Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Methodology of window forensic

ü Lesson 02: Collecting volatile data & non-volatile data

ü Lesson 03: Window forensic analysis

ü Lesson 04: Gathering information by tools

ü Lesson 05: Examine whole file

ü Lesson 06: Examine network information

ü Lesson 07: Examine process information

ü Lesson 08: Examine event logs

ü Lesson 09: Understanding metadata

 

Module 07: Linux and Mac Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Methodology of Linux forensics

ü Lesson 02: Collecting file system information

ü Lesson 03: Collecting volatile data & non-volatile data

ü Lesson 04: Collecting login history and currently logged in user

ü Lesson 05: Collecting hostname, data, time, uptime data

ü Lesson 06: Gathering network information

ü Lesson 07: Gathering open port information

ü Lesson 08: Analyzing log files in Linux OS

ü Lesson 09: Collecting suspicious information

ü Lesson 10: Collection network information

 

Module 08: Network Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Introduction of network forensics

ü Lesson 02: Network forensics process

ü Lesson 03: Analyzing different network logs

ü Lesson 04: Log file analysis

ü Lesson 05: Log management challenges

ü Lesson 06: Analyzing network traffics

ü Lesson 07: Gathering info through sniffing

ü Lesson 08: Sniffing tools

 

Module 09: Investigating Web Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to web application forensics

ü Lesson 02: Indicators of a web attack

ü Lesson 03: Web application threats

ü Lesson 04: Web attack investigation methodology

ü Lesson 05: Analyzing web logs client/admin

 

Module 10: Dark Web Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to dark web forensics

ü Lesson 02: Layers of internet

ü Lesson 03: Tor browser architecture

ü Lesson 04: Investigating tor

 

Module 11: Cloud Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Cloud models

ü Lesson 02: Cloud computing threats & attack

ü Lesson 03: Cloud forensics

ü Lesson 04: Cloud crimes

 

Module 12: Investigating Email Crimes

ü Lesson 01: Email server architecture

ü Lesson 02: Understanding email structure

ü Lesson 03: Email crime investigation procedure

ü Lesson 04: Analyzing email

 

Module 13: Malware Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to malware forensics

ü Lesson 02: What is malware & what can malware do

ü Lesson 03: Type of malware

ü Lesson 04: Different ways malware can get into a system

ü Lesson 05: Components of malware

ü Lesson 06: Types Malware analysis

ü Lesson 07: Tools for malware analysis

ü Lesson 08: Deep study on malware cases

 

Module 14: Mobile Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Introduction of mobile forensics

ü Lesson 02: Why do we need mobile forensics

ü Lesson 03: Challenges in mobile forensics

ü Lesson 04: Mobile devices and fundamental component

ü Lesson 05: Mobile phone evidence extraction process

ü Lesson 06: Removable and external data storage

ü Lesson 07: Data Acquisition from iOS Devices & android

ü Lesson 08: Data Acquisition and Analyzing SIM Cards

ü Lesson 09: Examination and analysis

ü Lesson 10: Mobile forensic tools

 

Module 15: IoT Forensics

ü Lesson 01: Understanding the IoT forensics

ü Lesson 02: Understanding IoT & IoT issues

ü Lesson 03: IOT architecture

ü Lesson 04: Learning objectives of IoT forensics

ü Lesson 05: IoT security problems

ü Lesson 06: IoT attack surface area

 

Level 7: Web Application Security

 

Module 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 01: Networking and protocol

ü Lesson 02: Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) & Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS)

 

Module 02: Owasp Top 10

ü Lesson 01: Briefing about various frameworks

ü Lesson 02: Explaining the OWASP top 10

 

Module 03: Recon for bug hunting

ü Lesson 01: Subdomains enumeration

ü Lesson 02: Domains filtration

ü Lesson 03: Endpoints enumeration

ü Lesson 04: Grepping responses

 

Module 04: Advanced SQL Injection

ü Lesson 01: Union based SQLI

ü Lesson 02: SQL Authentication Bypass

ü Lesson 03: Error based SQLI

ü Lesson 04: Time-based SQLI

ü Lesson 05: In-band and out-of-band SQLI

ü Lesson 06: Create our own script to automate the process of Blind SQLi

 

Module 05: Command injection

ü Lesson 01: DVWA source code review

ü Lesson 02: PHP command injection with various functions

ü Lesson 03: Filter bypass

 

Module 06: Session Management and Broken Authentication Vulnerability

ü Lesson 01: Cookie hijacking

ü Lesson 02: HSTS policy bypass

 

Module 07: Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF)

ü Lesson 01: protection bypass

 

Module 08: Server Site Request Forgery (SSRF)

ü Lesson 01: Filter bypass

ü Lesson 02: Server-side configuration check

 

Module 09: Cross-Site Scripting (XSS)

ü Lesson 01: Explaining JavaScript

ü Lesson 02: Reflected JavaScript

ü Lesson 03: Stored JavaScript

ü Lesson 04: DOM-based JavaScript

 

Module 10: Insecure Direct Object Reference (IDOR)

ü Lesson 01: Universally Unique Identifier (UUID) protection

 

Module 11: Sensitive Data Exposure and Information Disclose

ü Lesson 01: GIT source code disclosure

ü Lesson 02: Client-side source code review

 

Module 12: Server Site Template Injection (SSTI)

ü Lesson 01: Template engine Explaining

ü Lesson 02: Various exploitation techniques with various Template engine

 

Module 13: Multi-Factor Authentication Bypass

ü Lesson 01: Brute-force attacks

ü Lesson 02: Creating wordlists

ü Lesson 03: Logic errors bypass

 

Module 14: HTTP Request Smuggling

ü Lesson 01: Explaining HTTP/1.1 and HTTP/2

ü Lesson 02: CL-TE attack

ü Lesson 03: TE-CL attack

ü Lesson 04: TE-TE attack

 

Module 15: External Control of File Name or Path

ü Lesson 01: Whitelisting and blacklisting

ü Lesson 02: Bypassing blacklisting

ü Lesson 03: Brief on regex

 

Module 16: Local File Inclusion (LFI) and Remote File Inclusion (RFI)

ü Lesson 01: Traversal payload

ü Lesson 02: Bypass WAF

ü Lesson 03: Reading and inclusion difference

 

Module 17: Directory Path Traversal

ü Lesson 01: Path traversal payload to read the file

 

Module 18: HTML Injection

ü Lesson 01: Explaining HTML web page

ü Lesson 02: Reflected HTML injection

ü Lesson 03: Stored HTML injection

 

Module 19: Host Header Injection

ü Lesson 01: Apache Config Brief

ü Lesson 02: Host header Explaining

 

Module 20: File Upload Vulnerability

ü Lesson 01: POST method explain

ü Lesson 02: Encoded POST method

ü Lesson 03: Various headers related to file upload

 

Module 21: JWT Token Attack

ü Lesson 01: JWT tokens algorithms

ü Lesson 02: Brute force on HS256 algo

ü Lesson 03: Logic error bypass

 

Module 22: Flood Attack on Web

ü Lesson 01: XXE vulnerability to cause DOS

ü Lesson 02: Business logic to cause DOS

 

Module 23: Report Writing

ü Lesson 01: POC ( proof of concept)

ü Lesson 02: Executive and Management Report

ü Lesson 03: Technical Report For IT and security Department

 

Level 8: Mobile Application Security

 

Module 01: Introduction to Mobile Penetration Testing

ü Lesson 01: Scope

ü Lesson 02: Methodology

ü Lesson 03: Tools

 

Module 02: Lab Setup

ü Lesson 01: Kali lab setup

ü Lesson 02: Burp suite setup

ü Lesson 03: Mobile penetration testing lab setup

 

Module 03: Android Architecture

ü Lesson 01: Layers of Android architecture

ü Lesson 02: Key Components

ü Lesson 03: Application lifecycle

ü Lesson 04: Security Model

 

Module 04: Apl File structure

ü Lesson 01: Core components

ü Lesson 02: Common file structure patterns

ü Lesson 03: File structure example

 

Module 05: Reversing App with Apktool

ü Lesson 01: Overviews

ü Lesson 02: Functionality

ü Lesson 03: Installation

ü Lesson 04: Usage

ü Lesson 05: Common usage case

 

Module 06: Reversing App with MobSf

ü Lesson 01: Overviews

ü Lesson 02: Functionality

ü Lesson 03: Installation and setup

ü Lesson 04: Feature and Capabilities

ü Lesson 05: Scan the app with mobsf

 

Module 07: Static Analysis

ü Lesson 01: Types of static analysis

ü Lesson 02: Tools and techniques

ü Lesson 03: Benefits

ü Lesson 04: How to perform static analysis

 

Module 08: Scanning Vulnerability with Drozer

ü Lesson 01: Overviews

ü Lesson 02: Dynamic analysis

ü Lesson 03: Injection attacks

ü Lesson 04: Exploitation

 

Module 09: Improper Platform Usage

ü Lesson 01: Definition

ü Lesson 02: attacks

ü Lesson 03: Impact

ü Lesson 04: Mitigation

ü Lesson 05: Tools and resources

 

Module 10: Insecure Data Storage

ü Lesson 01: Definition

ü Lesson 02: Storing passwords in plain text

ü Lesson 03: Unprotected databases

ü Lesson 04: Impact

ü Lesson 05: Mitigation

ü Lesson 06: Tools and resources

 

Module 11: Insecure Communication

ü Lesson 01: Definition

ü Lesson 02: Unencrypted protocols

ü Lesson 03: Missing or misconfigured SSL/TLS

ü Lesson 04: Impact

ü Lesson 05: Mitigation

ü Lesson 06: Tools and resources

 

Module 12: Insecure Authentication

ü Lesson 01: Definition

ü Lesson 02: Weak password policies

ü Lesson 03: Lack of multi-factor authentication

ü Lesson 04: Impact

ü Lesson 05: Mitigation

ü Lesson 06: Tools and resources

 

Module 13: Insufficient Cryptography

ü Lesson 01: Common vulnerability

ü Lesson 02: Impact

ü Lesson 03: Prevention and Mitigation

ü Lesson 04: Continuous monitoring and updates

 

Module 14: Insecure Authorization

ü Lesson 01: Common vulnerability

ü Lesson 02: Impact

ü Lesson 03: Prevention and Mitigation

 

Module 15: Client Code Quality

ü Lesson 01: Important of client code quality

ü Lesson 02: Code structure and Organization

ü Lesson 03: Readability and Maintainability

 

Module 16: Code Tampering

ü Lesson 01: Objective

ü Lesson 02: Techniques

ü Lesson 03: Detection and Prevention

ü Lesson 04: Implications

 

Module 17: Reverse Engineering

ü Lesson 01: Purpose

ü Lesson 02: Techniques

ü Lesson 03: Tools

ü Lesson 04: Reversing Malware

 

Module 18: Extraneous Functionality

ü Lesson 01: Security risks

ü Lesson 02: User Experience (UX) issues

ü Lesson 03: Code review and refactoring

ü Lesson 04: Automated Analysis tools

 

Module 19: SSL Pinning

ü Lesson 01: Public key Pinning

ü Lesson 02: Certificate Pinning

ü Lesson 03: Benefits of SSL pinning

ü Lesson 04: Certificate Authority (CA)

Module 20: Intercepting the Network Traffic

ü Lesson 01: Packet Capture

ü Lesson 02: Network sniffing

ü Lesson 03: Protocol Analysis

ü Lesson 04: Traffic Decryption

 

Module 21: Dynamic Analysis

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Dynamic Analysis

ü Lesson 02: How to perform dynamic analysis

ü Lesson 03: Dynamic Debugging

ü Lesson 04: Dynamic Decomplication

 

Module 22: Report Preparation

ü Lesson 01: Consider the objective of the report

ü Lesson 02: The test compiles a comprehensive report

ü Lesson 03: Detailing their findings of vulnerability

 

Module 23: IOS Penetration: Basics

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to IOS Penetration testing

ü Lesson 02: IOS structure

ü Lesson 03: How to secure you application

 

Module 24: Report Writing

ü Lesson 01: Proof of Concept (POC)

ü Lesson 02: Executive and Management Report

ü Lesson 03: Technical Report For IT and security Department

 

Level 9: IoT Pentesting

 

Module 01: Overview of IOT Why IOT is so important?

ü Lesson 01: What is Internet of Things (IOT)?

ü Lesson 02: Why is Internet of Things (IoT) important?

 

Module 02: Internet of Things (IoT) Pentesting

ü Lesson 01: OWASP TOP 10

ü Lesson 02: What is Internet of Things (IoT) Pentesting

ü Lesson 03: What is Internet of Things (IoT) Security?

ü Lesson 04: Previous Internet of Things (IoT) Security Hacks

ü Lesson 05: Internet of Things (IoT) Vulnerabilities

ü Lesson 06: Internet of Things (IoT) Pentesting Methodology

 

Module 03: Introduction of IoT

ü Lesson 01: How does Internet of Things (IoT) work?

ü Lesson 02: Advantages & Disadvantage’s

 

Module 04: Introduction to Sensor Network

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

ü Lesson 02: Use of sensor with example

 

Module 05: Communication Models in Internet of Things (IoT)

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 06: Frequency

ü Lesson 01: What is radio wave?

ü Lesson 02: Radio Frequency Spectrum band

ü Lesson 03: Explanation

 

Module 07: Wireless protocol

ü Lesson 01: Difference type of protocols

ü Lesson 03: Explanation

 

Module 08: Comparing web and IOT protocols

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 09: SPI, UART, I2C

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 10: Firewall

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 11: ARDUINO

ü Lesson 01: Explanation with practical

 

Module 12: Raspberry

ü Lesson 01: Explanation with practical

 

Module 13: Introduction to Mobile app platform

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 14: Flipper zero

ü Lesson 01: Explanation with practical

 

Module 15: Firmware

ü Lesson 01: Usage of firmware for penetester

ü Lesson 02: What is it?

ü Lesson 03: Extracting squashfs file system from file system

ü Lesson 04: How to obtain firmware?

ü Lesson 05: Explanation with practical

 

Module 16: Analysing IOT Hardware

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 17: SDR (software defined radio)

ü Lesson 01: Explanation with practical

 

Module 18: Conceiving a new IOT product- Product

Requirement document for loT

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 19: Basic Intro Cloud Iaas Paas Saas-loT data, platform and software

as a service revenue

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Module 20: Basic Introduction of ICS

ü Lesson 01: Explanation

 

Level 10: Endpoint Security

 

Module 01: Implementing Internet Security Antivirus

ü Lesson 01: Importance of Internet Security

ü Lesson 02: Malware

ü Lesson 03: Antivirus protection

ü Lesson 04: Internet security tips to know

 

Module 02: Multi Factor Authentication (MFA)

ü Lesson 01: Three Main Types of MFA Authentication Methods

ü Lesson 02: How Multi-Factor Authentication Works

ü Lesson 03: Multi Factor Authentication (MFA) Examples

ü Lesson 04: Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

ü Lesson 05: Adaptive Authentication or Risk-based Authentication

 

Module 03: Mobile Device Management For Industry

ü Lesson 01: What is mobile device management

ü Lesson 02: How mobile device management works

ü Lesson 03: Application security

ü Lesson 04: Identity and access management (IAM)

ü Lesson 05: Endpoint security

ü Lesson 06: BYOD mobile device management

 

Module 04: Data Loss Prevention (DLP)

ü Lesson 01: Data Loss Prevention (DLP) Basics

ü Lesson 02: Who use Data Loss Prevention (DLP)

ü Lesson 03: Why we need Data Loss Prevention (DLP)

ü Lesson 04: How does Data Loss Prevention (DLP) works

ü Lesson 05: Data Loss Prevention (DLP) solutions

 

Module 05: Security Information and Event Management

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Indexing

ü Lesson 03: Analysis logs and Alerts

ü Lesson 04: Dashboard creation

ü Lesson 05: Event Type

 

Module 06: Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) Attack

ü Lesson 01: What is Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) Attack

ü Lesson 02: Advanced persistent threat (APT) progression

ü Lesson 03: Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) security measures

ü Lesson 04: Application and domain whitelisting

ü Lesson 05: Access control

 

Module 07: Mitre Attack Framework

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Mitre

ü Lesson 02: Matrix

ü Lesson 03: Tactics

ü Lesson 04: Techniques and Sub-Techniques

ü Lesson 05: Mitigation

 

Module 08: Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) and Extended Detection

and Response (XDR)

ü Lesson 01: Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) / Extended Detection and Response (XDR) Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Common Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) / Extended Detection and Response (XDR) Products

ü Lesson 03: Kill Processes

ü Lesson 04: Managing Endpoints with EDR/XDR

ü Lesson 05: Use Case with SIEM, EDR and XDR

 

Module 09: Unified Threat Management (UTM)

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to Unified Threat Management (UTM)

ü Lesson 02: Feature of Unified Threat Management (UTM)

ü Lesson 03: Benefit of using Unified Threat Management (UTM) Solution

 

Module 10: Firewall

ü Lesson 01: Introduction

ü Lesson 02: Reason to have a firewall

ü Lesson 03: Modern Firewall Design

ü Lesson 04: Common Firewall Technologies

ü Lesson 05: Next Generation Firewall

 

Module 11: ISO 27001

ü Lesson 01: Introduction to ISO

ü Lesson 02: Updation in ISO 27001

ü Lesson 03: Clauses

ü Lesson 04: Controls

 

Level 11: AWS Associate

 

Module 01: Designing Highly Available, Cost-effective, scalable systems

ü Lesson 01: Planning and Design

ü Lesson 02: Monitoring and Logging

ü Lesson 03: Hybrid IT Architectures

ü Lesson 04: Elasticity and Scalability

 

Module 02: Implementation and Deployment

ü Lesson 01: Amazon EC2

ü Lesson 02: Amazon S3

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Web Service Cloud Formation

ü Lesson 04: Amazon Web Service VPS

ü Lesson 05: Amazon Web Service IAM

 

Module 03: Data Security

ü Lesson 01: AWS IAM(Identify and Access Management)

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Web Service VPC

ü Lesson 03: Encryption Solutions

ü Lesson 04: Cloud watch logs

ü Lesson 05: Disaster Recovery

ü Lesson 06: Amazon Route 53

ü Lesson 07: AWS Storage Gateway

ü Lesson 08: Disaster Recovery

ü Lesson 09: Amazon Web Service Import/Export

 

Module 04: Troubleshooting

ü Lesson 01: Check AWS services Health

ü Lesson 02: Monitor and Optimize resource usage

 

 

Level 11: AWS Associate

 

Module 01: Designing Highly Available, Cost-effective, scalable systems

ü Lesson 01: Planning and Design

ü Lesson 02: Monitoring and Logging

ü Lesson 03: Hybrid IT Architectures

ü Lesson 04: Elasticity and Scalability

 

Module 02: Implementation and Deployment

ü Lesson 01: Amazon EC2

ü Lesson 02: Amazon S3

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Web Service Cloud Formation

ü Lesson 04: Amazon Web Service VPS

ü Lesson 05: Amazon Web Service IAM

 

Module 03: Data Security

ü Lesson 01: AWS IAM(Identify and Access Management)

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Web Service VPC

ü Lesson 03: Encryption Solutions

ü Lesson 04: Cloud watch logs

ü Lesson 05: Disaster Recovery

ü Lesson 06: Amazon Route 53

ü Lesson 07: AWS Storage Gateway

ü Lesson 08: Disaster Recovery

ü Lesson 09: Amazon Web Service Import/Export

 

Module 04: Troubleshooting

ü Lesson 01: Check AWS services Health

ü Lesson 02: Monitor and Optimize resource usage

 

 

AWS Cloud Security

 

Module 01: Overview of Security in Amazon Web Service (AWS)

ü Lesson 01: Amazon Web Service (AWS) shared security responsibility model

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Web Service (AWS) account security features

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Security services

 

Module 02: AWS Identity and Access Management

ü Lesson 01: IAM Authentication

ü Lesson 02: IAM Authorization

ü Lesson 03: Aws Organization

ü Lesson 04: SSO (Single SignOn)

 

Module 03: AWS Virtual Private Cloud

ü Lesson 01: Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) Peering Connection

ü Lesson 02: Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) Flow Logs

ü Lesson 03: Virtual Private Network (VPN) Connection

 

Module 04: Data Security in AWS

ü Lesson 01: Encryption and decryption fundamental

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Web Service (AWS) KMS

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Macie

 

Module 05: Securing Servers in Amazon Web Service (AWS)

ü Lesson 01: EC2 Security

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Inspector

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Shield

 

Module 06: Edge Security in AWS

ü Lesson 01: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Web Application Firewall (WAF)

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Cognito

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Guard Duty

ü Lesson 04: Security Hub

 

Module 07: Monitoring in AWS

ü Lesson 01: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Cloud watch

ü Lesson 02: Monitoring Amazon EC2

 

Module 08: Logging and Auditing in AWS

ü Lesson 01: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Cloud Watch Logs

ü Lesson 02: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Cloud Trail

ü Lesson 03: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Artifact

ü Lesson 04: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Config

ü Lesson 05: Amazon Web Service (AWS) Trusted Adviso

Enrollment Information:

Class Mode: Online And Offline
Duration: Flexible scheduling options available.
Location: Conveniently located in Rohtak City.
.
Elevate Your Cybersecurity Career with a Diploma Course: Unveiling the Path to Proficiency

 

In today's interconnected world, the realm of cybersecurity stands as a bulwark against digital threats, safeguarding individuals, businesses, and nations alike. As cyberattacks grow in frequency and sophistication, the demand for skilled cybersecurity professionals continues to soar. For those aspiring to enter this dynamic field or seeking to advance their careers, a cybersecurity diploma course presents an invaluable opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to excel. In this blog, we unveil how such a course can help propel you towards a rewarding cybersecurity career.

 

Comprehensive Curriculum

 

A cybersecurity diploma course typically offers a comprehensive curriculum that covers a wide array of topics relevant to the field. From foundational concepts such as networking and cryptography to advanced techniques like penetration testing and incident response, students gain a holistic understanding of cybersecurity principles and practices. By delving into both theoretical concepts and practical applications, participants emerge equipped to tackle real-world challenges with confidence.

 

Hands-On Experience

 

One of the hallmarks of a quality cybersecurity diploma course is its emphasis on hands-on experience. Through practical exercises, lab sessions, and simulated scenarios, students have the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge in a controlled environment. This hands-on experience not only reinforces learning but also cultivates critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making skills essential for success in the cybersecurity field.

 

Industry-Relevant Certifications

 

Many cybersecurity diploma courses are designed to align with industry certifications, providing students with the opportunity to earn valuable credentials recognized by employers worldwide. Whether it's CompTIA Security+, Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), or Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), obtaining relevant certifications enhances credibility and opens doors to a myriad of career opportunities. Moreover, the knowledge and skills acquired through certification preparation serve as a solid foundation for continued professional growth and specialization.

 

Networking Opportunities

 

Participating in a cybersecurity diploma course offers more than just academic enrichment—it fosters valuable networking opportunities. Interacting with instructors, fellow students, and industry professionals allows participants to expand their professional network, gain insights into industry trends, and forge meaningful connections that can lead to mentorship, collaboration, and career advancement.

 

Career Development Support

 

Many cybersecurity diploma programs provide career development support to help students transition smoothly into the workforce. This support may include resume writing assistance, interview preparation workshops, job placement services, and access to recruitment networks. By leveraging these resources, graduates can effectively showcase their skills and expertise to prospective employers and secure fulfilling cybersecurity roles.

 

Conclusion

 

In an increasingly digitized world fraught with cybersecurity threats, the need for skilled professionals capable of defending against such threats has never been greater. A cybersecurity diploma course serves as a springboard for individuals looking to enter or advance their careers in this dynamic field. By offering a comprehensive curriculum, hands-on experience, industry-relevant certifications, networking opportunities, and career development support, such courses empower participants to thrive in the ever-evolving landscape of cybersecurity. Whether you're a newcomer to the field or a seasoned professional seeking to sharpen your skills, investing in a cybersecurity diploma course can unlock a world of opportunities and propel you towards a fulfilling and impactful career in cybersecurity.

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     mostly all free tools comes with backdoor for seacurity reason use our published tools in rdp or vmware.

 

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